"Buy Your Label" installation

The series "Buy your Label" presents a topic that is hard to see clearly from the outside because we are all involved. It depicts innate or established traits, age, structural, or even spiritual differences through analogies found in nature.

The diverse appearance of individuals is determined by genetics, time, environment, and human interventions. However, our present civilization sees many uniqueness as a flaw.

The series communicates through non-judgemental glasses. There is no surface left for attacks because the uniqueness of the trees is entirely accepted.


OVERSIZED

acrylic on canvas  // 90 x 90
2020


labels

It is not just the parallels between man and nature that appears in the works: The trees look like objects, labelled like a piece of clothing in a shop. These "products" are metaphors for people, just as we identify with the clothes we wear, the size marking on them, or the lifestyle and slogan represented by the brand. Identification is mainly subconscious, and then it takes control of the evolution of our self-esteem and becomes suffocating.

Labels are promising in the business world. A good font, an inviting message, and mistakes turn into quality. The buyer knows that other people will wear them too, and this will eliminate the anxiety about differences. It promises a sense of novelty, the possibility of perfection.



The name "Buy Your Label" is not only directed at labels, but also points to a significant social thinking scheme. Eckhart Tolle explains how we attach labels to everything in our lives: "Who am I?" To this question we can only respond with our name, our occupation, our gender, past actions that are all true in a way, but they are far away from reality. The question cannot be answered with words. Since our thinking is language-based, it may seem a paradox. The answer lies behind the thoughts.

Buy your label! The slogan, the broken branches found in the forest, or the boxing of living vegetation, turning it into a luxury item, snatching it from the real habitat points to the way the business world recognizes and plays on this weak point. The installation also retains personal, intimate details, so it still recalls nature at some level.



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